Monthly Archives: December 2021

man's sexual life change at 40 years of age

Does a man’s sexual life change at 40 years of age?

It is not a law of life, but after turning 40, a man may begin to feel that he does not have the potency and sexual desire as before. And your concern only compounds the problem. Couples can help their partner to regain his appetite for sex, and for that, it is very important to know the causes of this gradual change in male sexual life and what we can do to avoid the progressive decrease in sexual desire of the forty-year-old man.

Causes of male sex life changes

Andropause

After age 40, men decrease the production of testosterone, the key hormone of male sexual desire, in a process similar to that of menopause in women.

Low male self-esteem

As always, women are better informed and prepared for menopause, however, most men do not know anything about andropause and when it appears they suffer a drop in their self-esteem. This is the true cause that leads the 40-year-old to look for younger women to reaffirm their attractiveness and sexual potency.

Effects of stress on men

Stress reduces the sex drive in men and women. After the age of forty, the loss of self-esteem causes stress; conflicts at work cause stress; worries with the economic crisis cause stress. And stress, we already know, causes a decrease in desire for sex.

Professional problems and the social future

At the age of 40, either you have succeeded professionally or it will be very difficult to do so. The fight for the long-awaited professional promotion, the fear of unemployment, and the pressure of young professionals (and women, especially) push men into unbridled professional and social dynamics. And the great victim is sex.

The physical decline of man

Youth is not eternal and you cannot fight against a sedentary lifestyle, hair loss, big belly, smoking, and drinking too much alcohol. When the man notices his masculine physical decline in front of the mirror, he loses appreciation for his figure, loses self-esteem, and the desire for sex sinks.

Consult Dr P K Gupta, best sexologist in Delhi, if you have any sexual problems.

hiv and covid 19

COVID-19 and the HIV Response

The COVID-19 pandemic was (and still is) a harsh burden on the ability to access healthcare services and resources globally. Before the pandemic, doctors and public health officials were hopeful that the decline in HIV cases would continue to drop, and a campaign to eliminate the AIDS epidemic by 2030 was underway. Then, the pandemic hit and set that goal back.

So how exactly has COVID-19 affected HIV response? Broadly speaking, the pandemic impacted the healthcare access of marginalized communities the most¹. Low-income workers and people of color were disproportionately impacted, and ethnic minority groups already faced more barriers in regards to healthcare equity before the pandemic begun². Coupled with the fact that HIV is most prevalent amongst low-income and marginalized groups, COVID-19 only made the fight for healthcare equality and against HIV more difficult. In total, over 20 million people became unemployed, leading many to lose their health insurance and unable to access necessary preventative HIV resources.

Over the course of the pandemic, there have been 670,000 less HIV screenings and 4,900 less diagnoses of HIV. PrEP prescriptions have declined 21% nationally. While these seem to be good signs, experts warn that it’s because less people are going to clinics to be tested and treated due to fears of contracting the virus, economic hardships, and stricter interactactions with physicians³. Drug overdoses have continued to rise, which doesn’t bode well for the 66% of HIV transmissions that happen via needles. As of 2019, 19% of people with HIV did not know they had it, and it’s possible that number has increased since the pandemic.  But, the fight against HIV is far from over and still looks hopeful. Over the past decade, HIV cases have dropped 23%³. The pandemic may have slowed progress, but the goal of eradicating HIV is far from unachievable. The focus is to get back on track by increasing resources available, urging more people to be tested, and promoting the use of PrEP and condoms. With the end of the pandemic on the horizon, it’s crucial to get back on track by advocating and supporting preventative measures against HIV. It takes all of us to do it.

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